thedogist:

Darwin, mix, Peck Slip & Front St, New York, NY

thedogist:

Darwin, mix, Peck Slip & Front St, New York, NY

radiochantier:

 Dizzy Gillespie

radiochantier:

 Dizzy Gillespie

(via wnycradiolab)

thedogist:

Rain, Dachshund (15 w/o), 17th & Broadway, New York, NY @raindrop_nyc

thedogist:

Rain, Dachshund (15 w/o), 17th & Broadway, New York, NY @raindrop_nyc

amnhnyc:

New Research Identifies Drivers of Rich Bird Diversity in Neotropics
An international team of researchers is challenging a commonly held view that explains how so many species of birds came to inhabit the Neotropics, an area rich in rain forest that extends from Mexico to the southernmost tip of South America. The new research, published today in the journal Nature and co-led by Brian Smith, an assistant curator in the Museum’s Division of Vertebrate Zoology, suggests that tropical bird speciation is not directly linked to geological and climate changes, as traditionally thought. Instead, it is driven by movements of birds across physical barriers such as mountains and rivers that occur long after those landscapes’ geological origins.
"The Neotropic zone has more species of birds than any other region on Earth," said Smith, who started this work as a postdoctoral researcher at Louisiana State University. "The unanswered question has been—how did this extraordinary bird diversity originate?"
Read the full story.

amnhnyc:

New Research Identifies Drivers of Rich Bird Diversity in Neotropics

An international team of researchers is challenging a commonly held view that explains how so many species of birds came to inhabit the Neotropics, an area rich in rain forest that extends from Mexico to the southernmost tip of South America. The new research, published today in the journal Nature and co-led by Brian Smith, an assistant curator in the Museum’s Division of Vertebrate Zoology, suggests that tropical bird speciation is not directly linked to geological and climate changes, as traditionally thought. Instead, it is driven by movements of birds across physical barriers such as mountains and rivers that occur long after those landscapes’ geological origins.

"The Neotropic zone has more species of birds than any other region on Earth," said Smith, who started this work as a postdoctoral researcher at Louisiana State University. "The unanswered question has been—how did this extraordinary bird diversity originate?"

Read the full story.

nprbooks:

Think the Internet is degrading the reading habits of the young? That millennials are Snapchatting themselves into a cultureless stupor? Well, think again!

A new study finds that young Americans are more likely to have read a book in the past year than their older counterparts. According to data from the Pew Research Center, “88% of Americans under 30 read a book in the past year, compared with 79% of those age 30 and older.” In another surprise, people under 30 were also more likely to say that there is “a lot of useful, important information that is not available on the Internet.”

Read on, America! (More book news here.)

smithsonianlibraries:

Royale with cheese??
Image of “Haematornis holospilus” (possibly Spilornis holospilus the Philippine serpent eagle) from “Zoologia typica" (1849)

smithsonianlibraries:

Royale with cheese??

Image of “Haematornis holospilus” (possibly Spilornis holospilus the Philippine serpent eagle) from “Zoologia typica" (1849)

smithsonian:

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction. The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report. 

smithsonian:

The world we’ve created for birds is a gauntlet of death. This infographic, based on Smithsonian research included in the just released State of the Birds report, shows how our actions impact their population numbers. The report’s release coincides with the 100th anniversary of the death of “Martha” the last passenger pigeon, a species that once numbered in the billions but was hunted to extinction.

The report is the most comprehensive look at U.S. birds and the news isn’t great: 228 birds species are currently at risk of extinction. But the good news is that we can fix it. The report indicates that many species have rebounded with dedicated conservation efforts. Read our summary or the full report

nprbooks:

A new Haruki Murakami book is coming out in December. The 96-page The Strange Library tells the story of a boy who stops at his local library and encounters an old man who holds him captive and forces him to read books, planning to eat his brain in order to absorb his knowledge. With his fellow captives, a girl with some unusual talents and a sheep-man, the boy tries to escape. It will be translated from Japanese by Ted Goossen and published by Knopf.
More book news here.
Image via Knopf

nprbooks:

A new Haruki Murakami book is coming out in December. The 96-page The Strange Library tells the story of a boy who stops at his local library and encounters an old man who holds him captive and forces him to read books, planning to eat his brain in order to absorb his knowledge. With his fellow captives, a girl with some unusual talents and a sheep-man, the boy tries to escape. It will be translated from Japanese by Ted Goossen and published by Knopf.

More book news here.

Image via Knopf